Work it!

(I think I’ve watched too much ‘America’s Next Top Model’ to have come up with that title for the post…..)

As I’ve become more involved in my therapy, I’ve really come to realize that therapy is indeed hard work. And I think my (new) therapist, Dr. L, has brought out something in me that I haven’t always found in myself: my own true self. I find myself crying pretty much every session, and it’s not necessarily because I’m sad. I find that I am being able to be more honest to myself than I ever knew how to be. Part of this might have to do with Dr. L and how I get along with her, but all the treatments I’ve had up to now have finally begun to pay off for me to get to this point in my treatment plan.

After every session, Dr. L gives me a hug and tells me how proud she is of me. For a long time, I found it kind of odd that she was proud of me, but lately, I’m kind of thinking that I should be proud of myself for making it at least this far.

I found the stuff below on helpguide.org:

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From: http://helpguide.org/mental/psychotherapy_therapist_counseling.htm

Making psychotherapy work for you

Therapy is hard work, but the rewards are worth it. Here are some tips for getting the most out of your therapy:

-Don’t expect the therapist to tell you what to do. You and your therapists are partners in your recovery. Your therapist can help guide you and make suggestions for treatment, but only you can make the changes you need to move forward.

-Share what you are feeling. You will get the most out of therapy if you are open and honest with your therapist about your feelings. If you feel embarrassed or ashamed, or something is too painful to talk about, don’t be afraid to tell your therapist. Slowly, you can work together to get at the issues.
-Make a commitment to your treatment. Don’t skip sessions unless you absolutely have to. If your therapist gives you homework in between sessions, be sure to do it. If you find yourself skipping sessions or are reluctant to go, ask yourself why. Are you avoiding painful discussion? Did last session touch a nerve? Talk about your reluctance with your therapist.
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